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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

The extent of natural bamboo forests in the mixed bamboo areas in
the Kassalong and Rainkhiong Reserve Forests in the Chittagong Hill Tracts
(CHT), Bangladesh are 76192 ha (188275 acre) and 27256 ha (67352 acre)
respectively (Anon. 1963).

Bamboos in these forests occur as an understorey with the tree species.
Eight bamboo species are indigenous to the area. Four of these species—
Muli (Melocanna bambusoides), Mitinga {Rambnsa tuldd), Daloo (Teinostaebyum
dtdlooa) and Orah (Dendrocalamtis longispathns) are of commercial importance.
A fifth species Kaliserri (Oxytenentbera auriculatd} reaches commercial size but
is of limited occurance. The remaining three species, Kali (Oxytenantbera
nigrociliata) Bariala (Bambtisa vtdgaris ) and Bazali (T’einostachyuni griffithii} are
of small size and assume a shrub-like growth and are of little commercial
importance (Zahiruddin 1959).

Abstract:

Deer is an important mammalian fauna
of Bangladesh. It plays an important role in
maintaining the forest ecosystem. Blanford,
in 1888, recorded five species of deer in this
region. These were the Barking Deer
{Mjintiaciis inuntjak Zimmermann), the
Spotted Deer {Axis axis Erxleben), the Hog
Deer {Axis porcinus Zimmermann), the Swamp
Deer {Ccrvns diivanceli Cuvier) and the
Sambar {Cervas unicolor Kerr). However,
updating of this old record was necessary
because during this period wanton deforestation
and indiscriminate huntings had taken place
resulting in ecological changes and
disappearance of quite a few animal species.
A reconnaissance survey of the wildlife of
Bangladesh was, therefore, carried out between
April and December, 1978 ; and special
attention was given to ascertain the present
position of deer.

Abstract:

The long interval of flowering and seeding has made propagation of
bamboos very difficult. Offset plantings are not suitable for large scale plantations.
Attemps with branch cutting, layering, etc. for propagation showed
low percentage of success. Tissue culture has yet to be tried.
In tissue culture the entire primordial structure might have to be used
as a propagule unlike the use of only callus tissue as in the case of dicots.
The present study showed that rhizome buds are monoprimordial, represented
by the cone of rudimentary sheaths only. The food stored in the rhizome
and rhizomatous swelling is utilized by their lateral and terminal buds. The
root primordia are borne outside rhizome-buds. The culm and branch-buds
are multiprimordial. Each structure is similar to the rhizome consisting of
root, rhizome and shoot primordia.

Abstract:

Mangrove forests, locally known as Sundarbans,
‘Para ban’ in Chittagong play an
important role as a direct source of timber,
fuel, tannin, pulpwood and raw material
for match industries. Besides, it also provides
protection against tidal bores and cyclones.
Due to its inherent property to build soil

Abstract:

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Abstract:

Kiln drying is a common practice in seasoning
timbers all over the world. In Bangladesh,
kiln drying of timber is employed by the timber
complexes of the Bangladesh Forest Industries
Development Corporation (BFIDC) and some
government and private organisations. In
order to facilitate the proper seasoning of
timbers, kiln drying schedules have been
developed at the Forest Research Institute,
Chittagong (Ali, Sattar and Talukdar 1975;
Sattar 1980). In conventional kiln drying,
low temperature and high humidity are
generally employed in the initial stages of
drying, which ultimately make the process
slow. The need for accelerated drying of
timbers, without deteriorating the quality of the
product itself, is thus felt. High temperature
drying was first envisaged to alleviate the

Abstract:

Chittagong and Chittagong Hill Tracts
of Bangladesh arc well known for natural
Garjan (Dipterocarpns tnrbinatiis Gacrtn. F.).
These are lofty trees having clean cylindrical boles and elevated crowns. The
wood is the major raw material for railway
sleepers, poles and boat-building. Due to
its high demand and consequent over exploi-

Abstract:

Until the partition of the British-India
in 1947, the use of hardwood in the territories
now under Bangladesh was restricted
only to railway sleepers, furniture and construction
materials for a few wealthy people. The demand of Wood was, therefore, very
little and this small amount of timber was
usually imported. As a result timber resources
of the country did not receive due importance
in the past.

Abstract:

Sungrass {Imp era la cylindrica L. Beauv)
though brings substantial amount of revenue
in Bangladesh, its control is a problem in
the forest plantations. Sungrass, by its
tangled root-system, retards the growth of
seedlings and in addition increases fire hazards
(Chowdhury i960). Area clear-felled for
plantation is soon invaded by sungrass unless
the soil is covered quickly by a forest
species. Moreover, the growth of sungrass. adversely affects the soil quality. During
off-seasons, the shoot of sungrass dies
exposing the land. The land thus exposed
severe sun tremendously loses soil fertility
in various ways—a characteristic of the tropical
zones (Rehm 1975). It was, therefore,
necessary to find a suitable species for
covering the sungrass infested lands by a
forest tree crop.

Abstract:

Bamboo is of great importance in
Bangladesh and stands next to wood in utility.
It is extensively used for the construction
of houses, bridges, rafters and for many
other purposes. Split bamboo is used by the villagers as a
reinforcement of mud walls,
bamboo has multiple uses.
bamboo starts shrinking during the initial
stages of drying and has shown considerable wall material and also as a
As a whole,
Unlike wood,

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