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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

Bamboo blight causes mortality of
emerging, partly grown or fully elongated
culms. Symptoms and causal pathogens have
been described by Rahman (1978) and Rahman and Khisha (1983). Boa (1983)
has reported the distribution of the blight
and relative susceptibility of various bamboos
in Bangladesh. Bambusa balcooa Roxb,

Abstract:

Bent solid wood is advantageously
employed in fabricating a variety of products.
Bending is an economical technique
in the manufacture of sports goods, walking
and umbrella sticks, chair parts, barrel
staves, wood rings and covers. Some work
has been done to evaluate the bending
characteristics of woods in many countries.
The level of moisture content of wood
and the period of steaming in the process
of bending are considered important criteria
for bending wood (Anon. 1948, Anon.
1959, Anon. 1967, Martin and Wangaard
1950, Rehman et all 1956). However, no
detailed study has been made on Teak
wood in this regard. It is, therefore

Abstract:

Teak (Tectona grandis L.) is the premier
species both in terms of properties, and
appearance and is the top demanded
species in Bangladesh. In recent years, heavy
demand of timbers in the industries has
led the Forest Department to choose fast
growing species on short rotations. Still
the demand of Teak for constructional and
cabinet manufacturing purposes and also
for export is very high. It is, therefore,
being planted only under the long rotation
cycle.
Stump planting is the usual practice
for raising Teak plantations. Seedlings are
raised in the nursery, one year ahead, for
stump-planting during May-June in the

Abstract:

Bangladesh is deficient in vegetable
oils. Indigenous sources of vegetable oils
are the agricultural oil crops. Soyabean, coconut,
sunflower and other vegetable oils are
imported to supplement the quantity
produced in the country. Because of acute
shortage of agricultural land, the possibility of increasing oil production by bringing
more agricultural land under cultivation
of oil crops is remote

Abstract:

Sundri (Her Hi er a fames Buch.-Ham.)
is one of the important tree species of the
tidal forests of Sunderbans having wide
range of uses from fire-wood to cabinet
making. Now a days it is the chief raw
material for making hardboard. Other
important uses are as props and transmission
poles. Ecologically, it is considered as the
climax species of this region (Champion
et al 1965) and has been growing well
in those regions of Sunderbans where salinity
is relatively low.

Abstract:

The forests of Bangladesh consist of
three major vegetation types occurring on
three distinctly different geomorphological
units : (i) the Tidal Swamps, consisting of mangrove forests (ii) the High Terraces,
consisting of deciduous forests and (iii)
the Tertiary Hills, consisting of mixed
evergreen forests. Soils of Bangladesh

Abstract:

Exploration and exploitation of natural
resources is a very important activity for
the continued economic growth of the
society. Many devices at different stages
of human civilisation were introduced for
the exploration of natural resources. In
the modern age Remote Sensing Technique
is one of the best tools for surveying natural
resources particularly in the inaccessible
areas. Modern remote sensing system from
space is the result of the development
process which began in the U. S. A. in the
mid sixties. This led to the Earth Resources
Technology Satellite ( ERTS) project
of NASA in 1970, now called LANDSAT.

Abstract:

Utilization of bamboo has taken great
strides in many countries. In the tropics,
especially in the South East Asia, bamboo
plays an important role in the village
economy and is extensively used for housing,
construction, handicrafts and many other
purposes. Besides, in the modern age,
bamboo finds extensive use as a raw
material in the pulp and paper industries.
Culms are the main plant parts of bamboo
used for various purposes. The present
yield of bamboo is not enough to meet
the increasing demand of the country. As
a result, the quantity and quality of culm
production, is most of the forest areas,
has been deteriorating due to over
exploitation.

Abstract:

Oil palm (Elaeis guineeiisis Jacq.) is
indigenous to West Africa (Zeven 1965,
Hartley 1967) where it grows wild in a
320-480 km coastal belt from Gambia to
Angola (Moe and Mohtadi 1971) E. guineensis
var. tennera, with thinner shelled fruits,
is a hybrid of ‘dura’- a wild variety with
thicker shell and ‘piscifera’ with no shell
(Rahman et al 1979). It is an exotic high
oil yielding fruit crop from Malaysia and
introduced in Bangladesh in 1978-79 with
a view to developing the domestic nonconventional
source of vegetable oil to
meet the demand of both edible and industrial
oils of the country. As such, Bangladesh
Forest Department initiated raising 4047
ha of oil palm plantation in the high
rainfall regions like Chittagong, Chittagong
Hill Tracts, Cox’s Bazar and Sylhct Forest

Abstract:

Mangium (Acacia mangium willd) is a
promising fast-growing multipurpose species
of the family Leguminosae and subfamily
Mimosoidcac. It is indigenous to
northern Australia, Papua New Guinea
and eastern Indonesia. The best known
stands are found in Queensland, Australia,
where the temperature ranges from 12°c
to 34°C and about 4,400 mm and 700 mm
rainfall are received annually during the
rainy and dry seasons respectively.

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