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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

FAST HISTORY
Mexico, Peru and Brazil, the plant
realise the economic importance of this plant and only from world
war II, plantations of this species came into realization in India* The
large -scale plantations were initiated in southern India, Orissa,- Bambay
and West Bengal. Simultaneously the processing industries also- -came up
and’as a result India became virtually the monopoly holder in the export
market of Cashewnut and other by-products out of this plant. During
1951, India earned 19 million dollars by export of cashewnut and other
by-products whereas during that year the earning from tea was only 16
million dollars. By now India’s earning of foreign exchange on account
of cashewnut and by-products has gone well over 35 crores.

Abstract:

The subject for the seminar was ’’Pie c hanization of
Site preparation”. During the Seminar and field trips, however,
much wider field was covered. Actually the technology and level
of mechanization of various forestry operations connected with
re-forestation, afforestation and protective afforestation was
discussed and demonstrated.

Abstract:

.
In Dacca district, the sal forests are limited within
the Dacca sadar North Sub-Division and in the district of
acres in Rajshahi district.
r . *
Sal is found only in the plains of
Dinajpur district,
Division and small patches in Thakurgaon Sub-Division. In
Rangpur district it is-limited within the Sadar Sub-Division.
In Rajshahi district it is limited within the northern portion
Mymensingh these are. limited within the Mymensingh Sadar and
Tangail Sub-Division and in the foot hills of Garo hills. In
these are limited within the Sadar Subof Noagaon Sub-Division. … . –
In area, Sal occupies approximately 64000 acres in Dacca
district, 1,78,890 acres in Mymensingh district, 16,344 acres
in Dinajpur district, 3410 acres in Rangpur district and 1057
Dacca,
I

Abstract:

Noakhali is a non-forest district of East Pakistan.
The problems of this district are many-fold of which the natural
calamities such as floods, tidal waves and Cyclone are the most
important. The district is located on the north of Bay of Bengal
which is notoriously a Cyclonic zone. The entire district is
flat, intercepted by mighty rivers and their delta. The Southern
part consists of a number of islands.which are continuously being
silted and enlarged. New islands are being formed due to siltation and appear only at low tide. The general level of the district
is a little above Sea level and a slight tidal wave causes destruction to houses and crops. It appears from historical records
that prior to 20th century the area was fully vegetated where
special efforts were made to colonize people by giving special
facilities in the remission of land revenue and cash advances etc.
In the beginning the Colonization was slow , most probably because
of the known ravages of the climatic factor due to its location.
The economic gains appear to have been so promising that in spite
of the dangers of climatic ravages the colonization progressed
steadily but slowly and at prese

Abstract:

Where there is sincere desire and a felt need for
improvement, there must be emphasis on research. In U.S.S.R.
there exists such an emphasis visible everywhere. Large number of research Scientists are engaged in productive research activities in many well-equipped research Institutes dealing with problems of logging and wood-based industries.Adequate funds are provided for annual budget of these institutes. They are provided with pilot plants and experimental
farms where they can try and test efficiencies of various
equipments and techniques designed and developed by them.

Abstract:

Prior to the partition of Indo-Pakistan sub-continent,
the sal forests of this sub-continent were managed under both
high forest systems and coppice systems. Of the high forest
systems-clear felling system and selection system and of the
coppice systems-the simple coppice system and the coppice with
standard system were mostly in practice. Selection system was
the main silvicultural system for sal in the outer hills of
the United Provinces. Selection system was never in practice
for sal in the portion now fallen in East Pakistan and the
only system for sal of this portion was coppice system. As a
result of working under coppice system, the sal forests of
this part have become deteriorated to a great extent.

Abstract:

Family: Elephantidae. ■ -Local name: Hati.
Its long
J
t 77 i-..
ELEPHANT
(Elephas maximus)
The majestic ’elephant which is associated with the
Indo-Pakistan Sub-continent from time immemorial with the
spendour of her princely pageantry is one of the most prized
animal of our forests. Along with the famed Royal Bengal Tigers,
this animal also can rightly claim to be one of the most fabulous
animal of this, part of the country. But unlike the Royal Bengal
Tiger which found its way from northern-cooler country, the
fossil remains prove beyond doubt that the elephants can claim
this Sub-continent as their ancestral home for long 5,00,000
years. Fossil remains of seven species of true elephants and
eight species of mastodons have been discovered in the IndoPakistan Sub-continent. They used to roam around the sub-continent
in the prehistoric days,. One by one they faced extinction and
to-day we are left with .only one species in the whole of the
Sub-continent. East Pakistan having possessed a share of this,
unique species of the;olden days can rightly be proud of.

Abstract:

Month
,n’.)
January,1970. Nil.” 64.2% 5O.5°F
0.47″ 62.07% 89°F
March, 1990. 1.08″ ?V”
1
( Data collected by Mr.Abdur Rahman Khan. )
•-■
. c.
• i. •
• /
I
1
Rainfall,
total for
the month.
(average for the
month.)
February ,1970
97°F
81°F
64.4°F

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