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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

This paper presents information on propagation and culm production of Bambusa
vulgaris and B. polymorpha by node cutting method. Five clumps each of B. vulgaris and B.
polymorpha were selected for the study. One culm from each clump of both the species were
collected and segmented into one-node cutting of 30 pieces in three sections (upper, middle and
lower) with sharp saw. Then propagules were developed from node cuttings in the soil bed
nursery during the rainy season (June-July). Node cutting of only middle portion of the culm
produced roots and rhizomes. Sixty six percent node cutting of B. vulgaris and sixty percent of B.
polymorpha of the middle portion produced roots. After having rooted and rhizomed successfully,
10 healthy propagules were planted at a spacing of 3.5 m x 3.5 m in the field for their growth
performance. Node cuttings of B. vulgaris produced 4.28 culms and those of B. polymorpha
produced 2.12 culms per clump per year. There is significant difference of culm production at 5%
level (t = 3.5678). After five years of the planting, the bamboo attained merchantable size and was
harvested from the clumps of both the species. This method with no temperature and moisture
control facilities and propagation structure was found suitable for the farmer.

Abstract:

Naturally crossed hybrids ofAcacia mangium x Acacia auriculiformis are found in the A.
auriculiformis and A. mangium plantations of Bangladesh. During 1995 superior hybrid Acacia
trees were selected and propagated by using shoot cuttings for establishing a hedge orchard.
Coppice shoots sprouted from this hedge orchard plants were used as stem cuttings for rooting
trials, and successful cuttings from different clones provided planting materials for clonal trial
experiments. There were highly significant differences between cuttings taken from different
zones of the shoot (cutting types) and hormone treatments in the number of successful cuttings
and number of roots produced per rooted cuttings. Tip cuttings (2 noded) rooted 71.5% and
produced 3.7 roots per rooted cutting when treated with 500 ppm IBA. Similarly, 3rd node cutting
also rooted 80.0% and produced 4.1 roots per rooted cutting under the same treatment. A slight
decrease in rooting success (55.5%) and number of roots (3.2) per rooted cutting were recorded in
4th node cuttings under the same treatment. But percentage of rooting success and number of
roots per rooted cuttings were not increased in the above mentioned three types of cuttings when
treated with higher concentration (1000 ppm or 1500 ppm) of IBA. When a higher concentration
of IBA (1000 ppm) was used in treating 5th node cutting better (50.0%) rooting success and
number of roots (3.3) per rooted cutting were observed. In respect to rooting success and number
of roots produced per rooted cutting the variation between the cuttings of different zone of the
shoot (cutting type) and hormone treatment was highly significant. There were significant
differences between clones in height growth. The highest and lowest height growth were recorded
in clone 2 (87.21cm) and in clone 13 (38.5cm) respectively.

Abstract:

Banspata (Podocarpus nerifolius) is endangered and the only indigenous naturally grown
gymnosperm species in Bangladesh. It is difficult to propagate largely through seed due to its
scarcity in natural forests. Current study shows that macro-clonal propagation technique can be a
tool for raising its propagules for commercial plantation as well as establishment of seed source.
Two types of cutting viz. young green leafy and woody non-leafy cuttings were treated with 300,
500 and 1000 ppm of IBA. In young green leafy cuttings 300 and 500 ppm of IBA treatment
showed better performance in terms of rooting percentage, root development and growth. But, in
woody non-leafy cuttings 500 and 1000 ppm of IBA treatment showed good rooting percentage as
well as root development and growth.

Abstract:

Koroi (Albizia procera) and arjun (Terminalia arjuna) are the two important species
included in the plantation programme in the central part of Bangladesh. Volume tables of these
two species planted in the area have been prepared. These volume tables are applicable for small
and medium sized trees of the respective species planted in the area.

Abstract:

Vegetable dye was extracted from the seeds of sinduri {Bixa orellana (Linn.)} using
water (soaking method) and ethyl acetate (soxhlet and reflux methods) as solvents. Reflux method
gave the highest yield (10.1%) while soxhlet method yielded 7.10% of dye. In soaking method,
seeds were soaked in water for four different time periods. The highest yield (8.93%) was
obtained in 18 hours out of 6,12. 18 and 24 hours soaking periods. Considering the chemicals and
processing cost, water soaking method appeared the best although it gave slightly lesser amount of
dye compared to other methods. The performance of the extracted dye for its edibility was studied
in laboratory against rats. After feeding the dye, mixed with waler, the physiological changes of
rats were observed. The test showed no adverse effect, and it seemed that the dye is non-toxic to
animals. Thus, it can be suggested as a substitute to chemical dye as food colourants.

Abstract:

Sissoo (Dalbergia sissoo), koroi (Albizia procera), akashmoni (Acacia auriculiformis),
babla (A. nilotica), mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) and raintree (Samanea samari) are the six
major species planted on the embankments and roadsides in the coastal areas of Bangladesh.
Growth data of these species were collected from the area, and growth models were selected by
regression techniques. The selected models may be satisfactorily used for the species in the area.

Abstract:

This paper attempts to explore the impacts of villagers living in the vicinity of the forest
area on forests and forest resources. For this, a survey was conducted on 171 households of eight
locations. The households were grouped into three farm categories upper, middle and lower.
From PRA exercise it was found that there was an overall shortage of fuel wood and other low
cost house-building materials. The villagers were partially dependent on the forest resources. The
lower farm category had the lowest number of bamboo than those of the upper and middle farm
categories. In upper, middle and lower farm categories, the forest and non-forest tree ratios were
found to be 67:33, 41:59 and 72:28 respectively and for all it was 60:40. The average tree income
ratios of homestead and forest were 57:43, 38:62 and 29:71 for the upper, middle and lower farm
categories respectively and for all it was 41:59. The average incomes from the business were 63%
for upper and 73% for middle and lower farm categories. The major shares of income (70%) came
from the business. Highest (25%) depletion of forest resources were in Bagerhat and the lowest
(4%) in Noagaon. It was elicited that the forest was depleted by about 12.5% annually.

Abstract:

Survival percentage and height growth of four types of planting propagules (stumps, poly
bag seedling, stumps in poly bag and direct seed sowing)of Gmelina arborea were studied at
Charaljani. Charkai, Keochia and Lawachara Silvicultural Research Stations located al different
regions of Bangladesh. There was no significant differences in the average survival percentage
among the polybag raised seedlings, stump planting, stumps in polybag and seeds directly sown in
the fields. The average survival percentage was 45% to 91% at four sites at the age of 2 years 4
months at Charaljani, Keochia, Lawachara and 1 year at Charkai Silviculture Research Station.
The difference in total height growth of four types of planting propagules was found statistically
significant. The highest height growth (263cm) was obtained in polybag raised seedling at
Charaljani followed by 105 cm at Keochia, 88 cm at Lawachara at the age of 2 years 4 months and
139 cm at Charkai at the age of 1 year after out planting. However, there was no differences in
height growth between the polybag seedlings and stumps in polybag at Lawachara Silviculture
Research Station

Abstract:

Wood destroying agents which attack wood
also attack wood products. It is well known that
preservation plays an important role in the use of
naturally non-durable species of wood and wood
products by increasing its service life. Similarly
preservative treated plywood has a greater service
life. The common preservatives for composites are
boric acid and borax. These compounds are effective
against decay and sap staining fungi and wood
destroying insects. Rubber wood (Hevea
braziliensis) is a non-durable species and susceptible
to fungal and insect attack quickly after sawing. It is
assumed that without preservative treatment rubber
wood could not be a suitable raw material for
plywood and particleboard manufacture. Veneer
obtained both from sapwood and hardwood of nondurable timber species when used for plywood
manufacture should be soaked in 1.25% solution of
boric acid or 1.90% solution of borax at a
temperature of 93°C to 100°C for a period of 10 to 40
minutes depending on species and thickness of the < veneer (Anon. 1983). With this aim in view the present study has been undertaken.

Abstract:

Seven types of Ocinuun, two from O. americanum, two from O. gratissimum, two
from O. sanctum and one from O. basilicum var. purpurascens, were studied for their
morphological differences, essential oil content and compositions. The oils were analyzed by GC
and GC/MS. All the types differ from one another in respect of their morphological characters as
well as their chemical constituents. Essential oil of the camphor type of O. americanum contains
camphor (40.3%) followed by limonene (8.8%) and oc-pinene (6.1%) as major constituents and
the citral type of O. americanum contains citral (63.4%) and linalool (7.0%) as major
components. The oil of O. gratissimum contains thymol (58.2%), y-terpinene (12.3%), p-cymene
(7.7%) and the var. clocimum of O. gratissimum contains eugenol (66.5%) and 0-ocimene
(18.1%) as major components. The major components of O. sanctum (green) are eugenol
(36.5%), P-caryophyllene (24.3%) and P-elememe (12.2%) and those of O. sanctum (purple) are
eugenol (77.5%) and (E)-caryophyllene (10.7%). The oil of O. basillicum var. purpurascens
contains linalool (30.8%), geraniol (28.8%) and geranyl acetate (14.1%) as major components.

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