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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

The term allelopathy, literally meaning
mutual harm, refers to the positive or negative
influences of one plant with or without microbial
action upon anotherthroughchemicalmeans other
than nutritional. Allelopathy depends on
chemical compounds mainly added to the environment from living plants or dead and decaying
parts(Tang 1986). Thenumber and diversityofthe
compounds involved in allelopathy are growing
rapidly. These chemicals may be produced by
various parts of the plant such as roots and leaves
(Horseley 1977), pollen (Ortega et al. 1988), seeds
or fruits (Friedman et al. 1982), although roots and
leaves are the main sources (Horseley 1977).
Autotoxicity is apparently a negative feature of
allelochemical production avoided by some
species through excreting or sequestering of
chemicals involved in structures. The
allelochemicals can be classified based on the
nature of producers, systematics of donor and
receiver, inhibitory and stimulatory activity or
upon the self or alien origin. During the last few
years effortshave beenmade to exploitallelopathy
for weed management, pest management,
comparison and rational cropping, agroforestry
and other

Abstract:

Dendrocalamus hamiltonii and Schizostachyum dullooa are the two
important threatened bamboo species of Bangladesh. They flowered gregariously during 1996 to 1998 and 1999 at the bambusetum of Bangladesh Forest
Research Institute,Chittagong and RangapaniTeaEstate, Hazarikhil, Chittagong
respectively. The flowering cyclesfor D. hamiltonii were estimated as 43 + 5 years
and for S. dullooa as 45 + 2, 35 + 2 and 15 + 2 years. Observations were made on
flowering nature, death and seed characters of these species. The germination
and seedling characters were also recorded. Planta tions of both the species were
raised with seedlings by the Forest Department and the NGOs. In future these
will be used as ex situ conservation plots.

Abstract:

This paper reports the distribution, nature and impact of damage, life
history, number of generations in a year, host records and biocontrol agents of
the beehole borer, Zenzera conferta Walker (Cossidae : Lepidoptera) infesting
keora (Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham.) plantations along the coastal belt of
Bangladesh. The pest profusely tunnels in the stem rendering the tree to wind
breakage. It probably completes two generations in a year. Besides keora, the
pest attacks Sonneratia caseolaris, Avicennia officinalis, A. alba and Tamanx indica.
Woodpeckers (Dinopium benghalense and Picoides canicapilltis) and a small black
ant were found to feed on the larvae and pupae of the pest.

Abstract:

The community structure and growing stock variations were studied in moist
temperate Quercusfloribunda forest on four different aspects and altitudesin Garhwal
Himalaya during the year 1996. The total density and basal cover values in the tree
layer varied from 250 to 340 trees/ha and 18.44 to 38.24 m2/ha respectively. The
maximum number ofsaplings (400 saps/ha) of Quercusfloribunda were observed on
the hill base of SE aspect, whereas, the lowest number ofsaplings (80 saps,/ha) on the
hill top of NW aspect. The maximum (1.8131) and minimum (1.4717) diversity values
were reported for NE and SE aspects respectively. The highest total growing stock
(349.0m3/ha) was observed on SW aspect. On NE aspect a strong positive correlation
(r=+0.88) was observed between the growing stock values and diameter classes.
Physicochemical properties of soils were found to be promising for the growth of
Quercusfloribunda forest on northern aspects as compared to southern aspects.

Abstract:

Homestead forestry, albeit its paramount importance and contribution to rural
socio-economy, remains a rather ignored area of study. This research focuses on the
floristic composition and socio-economic aspects of homestead forestry in two areas
(Habilashdip and Chunati Unions) in the district of Chittagong. Home gardens are
located close to houses and characterised by a mixture of annual and perennialspecies.
The proximity to natural forests and the availability of timbers in local markets also
seem to influence the propensity to plant timber and fuelwood in home gardens. Fruit
trees dominate the gardens, followed by fuelwood species. Women play an intensive
role in the management of home gardens. The article ends Vith an exhortation for
increased research on homestead forestry

Abstract:

The paper compares the economic performance of Eucalyptus camaldulensis
plantations of different ages. The price ofsawn timber per cubic metre was found
to be Tk. 4,076 to 8,828 (1 USS = 48.71 Tk.). The fuelwood was usually sold at a price
ranging from Tk. 915 to 1,677 per ton. The staking, felling and logging costs were
Tk. 864, 686 and 1,431 per hectare respectively. The IRRs were 22.87, 20.66,20.57,
39.13, 27.58, 12.67 and 59.81% for Dinajpur (rural Charkai), Dinajpur (urban
Charkai),Sylhet(Chawtali), Sylhet(Lawachara),Tangail(Charaljani), Mymemsingh
(Santoshpur) and Cox’s Bazar (Chainda) respectively at 10 years rotations. For
Dinajpur and Tangail, the NPVs were found to be negative for the 5th, 6th and
7th rotation ages

Abstract:

It is generally believed that the seedling of palmyra palm (Borassus
flabellifer Linn.) is difficult to transplant and hence requires directsowing. This
hinders mass propagation and plantation of this species. Its propagation is
mostly through natural means, and hence palm trees are found to grow
scatteredly. At present, palmyra palmhasbeen recognized as a priority species
for raising plantations in the coastal embankment. This study has been undertaken to develop technique for raising palm seedlings. Investigations suggest
that the bed mixture comprising 50% soil, 25% sawdust, 20% cowdung and 5%
ash was the best, where tire average elongation of germtubes and coleorhiza/
root-sheath was 37.3 cm by 7 weeks, the mixture depth of 38.1 cm wassufficient
to accommodate theircumulative growth. These elongated germtubes could be
removed from the temporary bed after 7 weeks of sowing seeds, when the tip
of emergent coleoptile is visible on the surface of the bed. Rootlets were also
found to occur in the root-sheath of all tire germtubes by that time. These
germtubes were then detached from theirseeds and transplanted immediately
into suitable polybags of22.9 cm x 30.5 cmsize. All the transplantated seedlings
survived and the emerging leaflets of these seedlings turned to green within a
week after transplantion. The mortality of early and late trasplanted seedlings
was 11% and 25% respectively. Germtubes were found to elongate up to 82.6%
within 4 weeks after sowing seeds. On the other hand, more than 50% elongation of the coleoptile was observed during the 5-7th weeks after sowing

Abstract:

In the context ofincreasing pollution in the cities, urban forestryhas been
suggested to redressthe adverse effects ofpollution. The role oftreesin reducing
air, gas and sound pollution in the urban areas has been discussed. The
contribution of vegetation to provide comfort to urban dwellers by improving
the climate has also been mentioned. The management aspect of urban forest to
maintain the health and vigour of urban vegetation has been narrated.
Appropriate tree species have been recommended for different locations in the
urban areas.

Abstract:

Sandal wood, Sautalum album L. contains
fragrant oil in the scented heartwood which issold
by weight, and perhaps it is the most precious
wood in this part of the world (Troup 1921).
However, Bangladesh imports sandal wood for
commercial purpose. Recently, the Bangladesh
ForestResearch Institutehad undertaken research
work on the silvicultural aspects of this species to
help raise its commercial plantations. The Forest
Department has undertaken an afforestation
project with this species. As a consequence,
hundreds of seedlings were raised in polybags in
January, 1993. A serious root rot disease was
observed in late February of the same year.
The typical symptom of the disease was
manifested through the gradual browning of the
leaves of the seedlings. Brown spots appeared
first on the branch and tap roots, which later
turned black. The leaves of the infected seedlings
lost their freshness and began to die out with the
stem standing erect. The disease caused 50%
mortality of the seedlings within 3-5 days. One
fungus, Fusarium moniliformae Sheld. was consistently isolated from the samples. A pathogenicity
test confirmed that the fungus was the pathogen
of the root rot.
The root rot ofsandal wood seedlings was
successfully controlledby the use ofDithaneM-45
@ one gram/I of water. The fungicidal mixture
was sprayed over the diseased and healthy
seedlings in such a way that the mixture could
reach the rootsystem. A second spraywas applied
after an interval ofone week. Arrangermentswere
also made for allowing sufficient light on the
seedlings for about six hours a day.
This disease is a new record on sandal
wood in Bangladesh. Although root rot is a
common phenomenon in our forest nursery, the
disease was indeed a serious one. No report of
such kind of root rot is available. Excess moisture
causes damping-off to the sandal wood seedlings
(Troup 1921). However, it was not a case of
damping-off. F. moniliformae is mainly a soilbome
fungus which can cause leaf blight of maize, foot
rot of rice and mango floral malformation
(Rangaswami 1988). It also causes pre-and
post-emergence seedlings blight of maize
(Baruah et al. 1985). Rahman et al. (1980) isolated
F. moniliformae from agar,Aquillaraiaagallocha tree.
The fungus can survive in soil for a long period,
and isfound in fields having general deficiency of
water (Singh 1983). In Bangladesh, January and
February are the months of dry and cold
period of the year. So, this may be the favourable
time for its sporulation and infection in our
country

Abstract:

The rural people depend largely on homestead forestry for their fuel, energy and house
building materials (Alam et al. 1988). Deforestation of this homestead forstry have been causing
severe environmental degradation and poor yield
of crops, livestock, fisheries, etc. (Haq 1986).
Considering these facts, the present study was
conducted to find out the perception of the
farmers regarding the impact of homestead
afforestation and deforestation on environmental
upgradation and degradation respectively.
The Salna village under Kaultia Union
which is adjacent to the national forest area of
Gazipur district was selected for thisstudy. Out
of 378 farmers 100 were selected randomly as
sample. Data were collected through personal
interview, using a semi-structured interview
schedule during October24 toNovember23,1996.
The trend of plant population was measured by
considering 1975 as the baseline year and then the
change was shown after 10 years (1985), 5 years
(1990), 5 years (1995) and the study year which is
1996. The 5 years gap was used for two times
because it was assumed that the awareness
programme regarding deforestation wasstrengthened from that time. The number of tree during
the past period was measured on the basis of
number mentioned by the farmers depending on
their memory. For this reason, the farmers aged
above 40 years were selected for the study

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