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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

A brief review is given of investigations into the cause of agaru, a valuable
aromatic oleoresinous deposit found in the stems of Aquilaria agallocha in
Bangladesh, East India and other parts of South East Asia.
In previous investigations various fungi have been identified in association
with agaru deposits but their casusal role in this context has not been fully
established.
The present investigation includes microscopic examinations and identification
of fungal isolates from four samples of agaru collected in the Sylhct region
of Bangladesh. From this evidence it is concluded that it is unlikely that there
is a specific fungal cause for agaru. Suggestions are made for further research.

Abstract:

An investigation was made to determine the possibility of making sulphate pulp
from rubber wood {Hevea brasiliensis). The pulp obtained was low in yield and the
permanganate number was very high ranging from 12.35 to 24.44 predicting a high
bleach requirement. The physical strength properties of the pulps were moderate.
Rubber wood pulp showed promise to be used for making moderate quality wrapping,
bag and average quality printing papers.

Abstract:

G^r]an.(Dipterocarpnsspp.) is the principal
species for railway sleepers in Bangladesh.
Wide and extensive use of this species has
already posed such a serious problem that
its supply is not adequate to meet the requirement
of the railway. As a result, sleepers are
being imported to alleviate the supply shortage.
It has, therefore, become essential to
find out other suitable indigenous species.
Considering its mechanical properties and

Abstract:

Until the partition of the British-India
in 1947, the use of hardwood in the territories
now under Bangladesh was restricted
only to railway sleepers, furniture and construction
materials for a few wealthy people. The demand of Wood was, therefore, very
little and this small amount of timber was
usually imported. As a result timber resources
of the country did not receive due importance
in the past.

Abstract:

Rattans are spiny climbing plants
belonging to the Lepidocaryoid Major Group
of the Palm Family (Moore 1973). In the
Malay Peninsula 9 genera occur : Calamus,
Daemonorops,korthalsia Plectocomia,
Plectocomiopsis, myrialepis Calospatha,

Abstract:

The gluing characteristics of many of
the indigenous timber species of Bangladesh
are not known. Adequate knowledge of
the gluing characteristics is essential for
optimum utilization of the timber resources
by the repsective industries like plywood
and laminated wood. It is established a
fact that gluability is a function of density
of wood, its structure, presence of extraneous
materials, etc. The study was undertaken
in finding out the gluability of Champa
veneer in the manufacture of plywood. Champa (Michelia champaca) a large
tree with a long straight cylindrical bole of
18 to 21 m in length and often of large
girth, is found in the Chittagong Hill
Tracts forests of Bangladesh. It is light,
(sp. gr. approx. 0.53), soft, straight grained,
even and medium textured. Its sapwood is
white, and the heartwood is light yellowish
brown to olive-brown, somewhat lustrous,
smooth working and takes good polish.
It weighs 497 to 546 kg/m3 at 12 percent
moisture content. The timber dries well

Abstract:

Behaviour of different birds and its
effects on agricultural crops were studied
in charland of the Padma belt under
Rajshahi district. A list of different migratory
and resident birds were prepared and
effects of those birds on agricultural crops,
mainly rice, were observed. The study
revealed that most of the birds are useful for
agricultural crops as they live on injurious
insects and thus save the crops from
destruction.

Abstract:

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Abstract:

The Sundarbans mangrove forest within
Bangladesh territory is managed under
selection system with natural regeneration
(Chowdhury 1968; Khattak 1979). A large
part of the forest is unproductive. There
are non-commeicial cover (N. C. C.) as
well as barren areas. Seven percent of the
area was devoid of forest cover (Anon.
1960). Another report (Anon. 1985), however,
states this figure to be 2%.
N. O. O. areas are composed of raised
lands or depressions which have become
unsuitable for natural regeneration with
mangrove species. Consequently, there are
potentialities for improvement of the land

Abstract:

Ground-layering and air-layering trials were carried out on
bariala (Bambusa vulgaris) and muli bansh (Melocanna baccifera)
All the treated branches of B. vulgaris
produced successful propagules in the air-layering experiment. The
ground-layer in a of twelve culms (2 years old) of the same species
also produced 23 rooted and rhizomed propagules. Initiation
rooting and rhizome appeared only in
in both of the layering experiments,
to any of the layering methods.

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