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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

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Abstract:

The furniture and joinery industries of Bangladesh mostly use manual labour
and hand tools both in manufacture and in surface finishing. Modern woodworking
machines have been introduced on a very small scale in the recent past, but
they have not met with much success due to the lack of proper technical know-how
and trained personnel. These industries are expected to expand. As the general
economic conditions improve and per capita income rises, there will be need for an
increased production of furniture and joinery.

Abstract:

A brief review is given of investigations into the cause of agaru, a valuable
aromatic oleoresinous deposit found in the stems of Aquilaria agallocha in
Bangladesh, East India and other parts of South East Asia.
In previous investigations various fungi have been identified in association
with agaru deposits but their casusal role in this context has not been fully
established.
The present investigation includes microscopic examinations and identification
of fungal isolates from four samples of agaru collected in the Sylhct region
of Bangladesh. From this evidence it is concluded that it is unlikely that there
is a specific fungal cause for agaru. Suggestions are made for further research.

Abstract:

An investigation was made to determine the possibility of making sulphate pulp
from rubber wood {Hevea brasiliensis). The pulp obtained was low in yield and the
permanganate number was very high ranging from 12.35 to 24.44 predicting a high
bleach requirement. The physical strength properties of the pulps were moderate.
Rubber wood pulp showed promise to be used for making moderate quality wrapping,
bag and average quality printing papers.

Abstract:

Air drying characteristics of garjan Dipterocarpus spp. railway sleepers were
investigated employing 1 x 5, 2 x 5, 1 x 7 and 2×7 piling methods. Although there
was no significant difference among the drying periods in different methods, the
2×7 method appeared to be the most efficient one. This method exhibited a
relatively shorter drying time irrespective of higher density and higher initial moisture
content of sleepers as compared to those in other methods. The faster drying
in the 2×7 method was attributed to better air circulation. Sleepers stacked in the
month of April, dried down to 28% mosisture content in about eight months on
the average. It is recommended that garjan sleepers be air dried following the
2×7 method during the active drying season beginning November, instead of April,
as was done in the present study, with a view to achieving further reduction in
total drying time.
The moisture distribution inside the sleepers was highly variable ; the moisture
gradient was steeper with increasing depth of the zone, but the steepness of
the gradient decreased with increasing drying time.

Abstract:

Jam (Syzygium grandis), because of its availability and strength properties,
was considered for substituting garjan ( Dipterocarpus spp. ) for making railway
sleepers. Since treatment with creosote is normally the part of the manufacturing
process for railway sleepers from nondurable wood, jam heartwood was treated
with Lowry empty cell process using 40 ; 60 creosote-petroleum oil preservative in
order to develop a treating schedule for jam sleeper. Treatments were performed
with the various combinations of treating schedules with or without the pretreatment
ot steaming-vacuum or incision. None of the treatments, however, could
achieve penetration and retention recommended for the purpose of railway sleepers

Abstract:

Black pepper (Piper nigrum, Linn.) locally known as gid marich – is a highly
prized spice with heavy demand in the western countries. Oldrecords indicate that
limited vines of the species were in Jessore and Sylhet districts. Large scale use
of black pepper as a condiment and scope of its introduction for multiple use
of land made the authors to initiate studies for cultivation and field studies in
Bangladesh.
Trials were given to raise the vines from stem cuttings on trellis as well as
on living support of available fruit trees. Different methods of raising cuttings
were also evaluated. Growth, flowering and fruiting behaviour were also observed.
Because of limited stock, work on pollination mechanism and ratio of
male and female flowers could not be undertaken.

Abstract:

This paper clearly shows that propagating bamboos from material
other than seed is possible. Propagation of bamboos from offsets is well
known and practised in village groves. The development of planting material
from branch cuttings is a two-stage operation. The first is the striking of roots
and the other, the development of a rhizome. Getting vigorous rooted stock is not
enough because this does not always develop rhizomes ; for this the biological
condition of the buds is very important. In bamboos, successful planting
material must have all the characters of growing clumps, the most important of
which is the production of new culms. Though offsets are a good propagating material,
these are not suitable for large scale plantations due to handling difficulties,
long branch cuttings with swollen basal nodes and 2-3 branch nodes
physiologically similar and can be made
branch
18-20 inch
are morphologically and to function
like the offset in suitable conditions. Such cuttings develop into
good planting material in 6-30 months, depending on the biological condition
of the cutting and the period of the year when the cuttings were taken.
The superiority of the branch cutting over the offset is in the fact that it is easy
to raise, economic to produce, and convenient to transport. At the moment the
percentage of success is low, and further research in the factors governing the production
of planting material from branch cuttings is necessary.This paper clearly shows that propagating bamboos from material
other than seed is possible. Propagation of bamboos from offsets is well
known and practised in village groves. The development of planting material
from branch cuttings is a two-stage operation. The first is the striking of roots
and the other, the development of a rhizome. Getting vigorous rooted stock is not
enough because this does not always develop rhizomes ; for this the biological
condition of the buds is very important. In bamboos, successful planting
material must have all the characters of growing clumps, the most important of
which is the production of new culms. Though offsets are a good propagating material,
these are not suitable for large scale plantations due to handling difficulties,
long branch cuttings with swollen basal nodes and 2-3 branch nodes
physiologically similar and can be made
branch
18-20 inch
are morphologically and to function
like the offset in suitable conditions. Such cuttings develop into
good planting material in 6-30 months, depending on the biological condition
of the cutting and the period of the year when the cuttings were taken.
The superiority of the branch cutting over the offset is in the fact that it is easy
to raise, economic to produce, and convenient to transport. At the moment the
percentage of success is low, and further research in the factors governing the production
of planting material from branch cuttings is necessary.

Abstract:

The paper examines the profitability of teak ( tectona grandis, Lin. f)
plantations under the existing system of management in Bangladesh. The Forest
Department has fixed 69 years as the rotation length for teak on all sites.
Land expectation values have been calculated on the basis of the Faustmann
formula and preliminary yield tables for three site qualities. They have been calculated
on the assumption that the sites would be used for teak plantations for
an infinite number of 60 year rotations. The sensitivity of results to changes in
the planting and overhead costs and in yields was also calculated.
The result indicates positive net returns for sites of qualities I to III under
all cost conditions at an eight percent rate of interest. At thirteen percent, sites
of qualities I and II show a positive result but those of quality III indicate a net loss
Land expectation values are not found to be a convenient index of profita

Abstract:

This paper deals with the effect of two growth hormones, IAA and IBA in
the rooting response of stem cuttings, rooting of branches by air layering through
the application of Seradix B-3, and bud and cleft graftings of six species in different
months. It was found that rooting occurred in four species with hormone applications
to stem cuttings ; of these, three species rooted throughout the year. In air layering,
four species roofed only in August-September. Bud grafting were successful in all
the species. Bud propagation in April-May was the most successful. Fair results
were also obtained from budding in November-December. Cleft grafting did not
show much response in any of these species.

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