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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

The effect ofsalinity on the germination of Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham.
was studied. The best germination success was observed in the 0-5 ppt salinity
range with the highest value (98.67%) at the 0 ppt (fresh water) level.
Germination success decreased significantly with the increasing level of
salinity. Increasing salinity also remarkably delayed the germination.
Satisfactory germination success was observed when salt treated seeds were
sown in fresh water condition. This indicates that salt has only a reversible
inhibitory effect on germination. The rate of recovery from the inhibitory effect
ofsalt was not found to be sensitive to the level of salinity, and did not exhibit
any definite relationship with the length of exposure of seed to the saline
condition

Abstract:

The term allelopathy, literally meaning
mutual harm, refers to the positive or negative
influences of one plant with or without microbial
action upon anotherthroughchemicalmeans other
than nutritional. Allelopathy depends on
chemical compounds mainly added to the environment from living plants or dead and decaying
parts(Tang 1986). Thenumber and diversityofthe
compounds involved in allelopathy are growing
rapidly. These chemicals may be produced by
various parts of the plant such as roots and leaves
(Horseley 1977), pollen (Ortega et al. 1988), seeds
or fruits (Friedman et al. 1982), although roots and
leaves are the main sources (Horseley 1977).
Autotoxicity is apparently a negative feature of
allelochemical production avoided by some
species through excreting or sequestering of
chemicals involved in structures. The
allelochemicals can be classified based on the
nature of producers, systematics of donor and
receiver, inhibitory and stimulatory activity or
upon the self or alien origin. During the last few
years effortshave beenmade to exploitallelopathy
for weed management, pest management,
comparison and rational cropping, agroforestry
and other

Abstract:

One hundred and eight species of macrohymenopterans belonging to
fifteen families and fifty six genera were recorded from the Silent Valley
National Park. The families Sphecidae, Formicidae, Pompilidae and Apidae
contained maximum number of species. The insects were collected from five
habitats, viz., tropical evergreen forest, subtropical broad leaved hill forest,
montane wet temperate forest, low altitude grasslands and high altitude
grasslands. Of the various species recorded in this study, seven genera and
eleven species are new reportsfor Kerala and seven species are new reportsfor
India

Abstract:

Eucalyptus camaldulensis poles were treated with 50 : 50 creosote-light
diesel oil mixture. The poles contained an average of 53.85% sapwood which
was readily perishable by wood destroying organisms if untreated. The poles
were treated by the Bethel Full-Cell process using varying pressure and
duration to evaluate the effect on penetration and retention of the preservative
mixture. It was found that with the simultaneous increase of both treating
pressure and time, no significant increase in pentration was achieved. On the
other hand, with the increase of treating pressure only, the retention of
pressrvative in the sapwood was increased significantly. A penetration of 3.5
cm with retention of 318. 45 kg/m3 in the treated sapwood could be obtained
by using 10.57 kg/cm2 pressure for 3 hours. This amount of penetration is
considered adequate to protect the sapwood region of the pole.

Abstract:

Teli garjan (Dipterocarpus turbinatus) is the most important indigenous
species included for long term plantation programme in Bangladesh. Site indices
models have been derived for the species in the plantations of Bangladesh. The
selected models derived in the study could be satisfactorily used for teli garjan
plantations having ages 3-60 years and site indices of 25-55 metres based on a base
age or rotation of 45 years.

Abstract:

A study was conducted with 15 lesser used/unused medium density
(0.52-0.68) wood species of Bangladesh to determine their hardboard making
characteristics. The species tested were barta (Artocarpus lakoocha), chalta (Dillenia
iiidica), dakroom (Mitragyna rotundifalia), gab (Diospyros peregrine), hargaza (Dillenia
pcntagynn), jhumka bhadi (Engelhardtia spicata), kamdev (Calophyllum polyanthum),
kao (Garcinia cowa), kasturi (Cinnamomum cecidodaphne), kerung (Pongamia pinnata),
moos (Pterospernium acerifolium), pairag (Canarium risiiiiferum), rata (Aphanamixis
polystachya), tali (Palagttiuni polyanthum) and uriam (Mangifera sylvatica). It wasfound
that all the species except barta, kasturi and uriam produced good or even better
quality hardboard than that ofsundri (Heritierafames) a widely used wood species in
Khulna Hardboard Mills

Abstract:

The exact flowering cycles (from seed to
seed) ofbamboos are known for few species. Most
of the pastreports on bamboo flowering cycles are
based on speculation and estimation (Hasan 1973,
Banik 1991). The flowering cycles for many
species of bamboo from India, Bangladesh and
Myanmar were reported (Cavendish 1905,
Blatter 1930, Bor 1941, Hasan 1973, Bahadur 1980,
Naithani 1990, Banik 1991, Alam 1995). This paper
presentsthe estima ted flowering cycles ofBambusa
burmanica Gamble, B. cacharensis Majumdar and
B. jaintiana Majumdar based on past records and
recent flowering (Table 1)

Abstract:

In 1990, a serious root rot disease was
observed in different strip plantations of Court
Chandpur-Subdalpur railroad, Jessore-Benapole
highway and Jessore-Satkhira road of greater
Jessore district. These plantations were covered
with trees such as Cassia siamea, Acacia
auriculiformis, A. nilotica, Albizia procera, Leucena
leucocephala and Dalbergia sissoo. The affected trees
died in patches showing wilting symptoms. C.
siamea, A. auriculiformis and A. procera were
affected most, whereas A. nilotica, L. leucocephala
and D. sissoo were least affected. The leaves of the
diseased trees became brown, dried up and
remained attached to the dead branches. After
excavation of roots, whitish mats of mycelia were
observed on the branch and anchor roots of the
trees. Typical fruit bodies were seen on the collar
region, exposed roots and on Clerodendruni
viscosum and Glycosmispentaphylla situated at the
vicinity of the infected trees (Figs. 1 and 2). The
bark of roots were rotted and, in most cases, the
rotting was extended up to the collar region. The
fungus responsible for the disease was isolated
and identified as Fames lignosus (Klotzsch) Bres.
Heavily infected trees were removed from the
sites. Basal area covering one metre radius of each
diseased tree was drenched with 2% commercial
formalin. The second spray was given 15 days
after the first. The sprays, however, could notsave
the diseased trees butfurtherspread ofthe disease
symptom was checked

Abstract:

Dendrocalamus hamiltonii and Schizostachyum dullooa are the two
important threatened bamboo species of Bangladesh. They flowered gregariously during 1996 to 1998 and 1999 at the bambusetum of Bangladesh Forest
Research Institute,Chittagong and RangapaniTeaEstate, Hazarikhil, Chittagong
respectively. The flowering cyclesfor D. hamiltonii were estimated as 43 + 5 years
and for S. dullooa as 45 + 2, 35 + 2 and 15 + 2 years. Observations were made on
flowering nature, death and seed characters of these species. The germination
and seedling characters were also recorded. Planta tions of both the species were
raised with seedlings by the Forest Department and the NGOs. In future these
will be used as ex situ conservation plots.

Abstract:

This paper reports the distribution, nature and impact of damage, life
history, number of generations in a year, host records and biocontrol agents of
the beehole borer, Zenzera conferta Walker (Cossidae : Lepidoptera) infesting
keora (Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham.) plantations along the coastal belt of
Bangladesh. The pest profusely tunnels in the stem rendering the tree to wind
breakage. It probably completes two generations in a year. Besides keora, the
pest attacks Sonneratia caseolaris, Avicennia officinalis, A. alba and Tamanx indica.
Woodpeckers (Dinopium benghalense and Picoides canicapilltis) and a small black
ant were found to feed on the larvae and pupae of the pest.

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