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BANGLADESH JOURNAL OF FOREST SCIENCE

A Half-yearly Peer Reviewed Journal of Bangladesh Forest Research Institute

ISSN - Print: 1021-3279 | Online: -
Abstract:

The paper presents the micromorphological features of culm epidermis of 26
bamboo species occurring in Bangladesh. Different attributes of long cells, silica
bodies, cork cells, stomata, papillae and dermal appendages are provided in a table.
The study reveals that these micromorphological characters have taxonomic value at
species level. But due to homogeneity any delimitation cannot be defined at
supraspecific level.
The paper also provides an identification key to 26 bamboo species occurring in
Bangladesh, based on culm epidermal characters.

Abstract:

An attempt was made to isolate and study the cellulolytic microorganisms from
the soil under two deciduous (Tcctona grandis L. f. and Lagerstroeinia speciosa L.) and
two evergreen (Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. and Acacia auricul’iformis A. Cunn.
ex Benth.) forest plantations, and the relation of these organisms with the soil
nutrient of the forest (N, P, K and carbon) has been observed. Among the isolates,
finally selected 11 isolates comprised of one bacterial strain (Cellulonionas sp.), five
strains of Streptomyces and five fungalstrains (Aspergill usflavus, A. nigcr,A.ochraceous,
Trichodernia lignorum, T. glaucum). Cellulolytic activity of these strains has been
reported.

Abstract:

Termite is one of the major problems of forestry, specially in the tropics. Losses in the
forest nurseries and plantations due to termite damage can be substantial. Damage by
Coptotermes, Odontoternies, Microcerotermes, Microtermes and Macrotermes have been found to
be serious. This paper describes damages caused by these termites and suggests measures
for their management. Various alternative strategies for their management have also been
reviewed and discussed.

Abstract:

Provenances of mangium (Acacia mangium Willd.) from Queensland (Australia),
Papua New Guinea and Indonesia were planted under three site conditions
of Ilocos Norte, Masbate and Bukidnon regions in the Philippines which are
edaphically, climatically and topographically different from each other.
Highly significant (P<0.01) variations in diameter, height and merchantable height growth performances of 18 provenances at Ilocos Norte, 12 provenances at Masbate and 12 provenances at Bukidnon at5.5 years after planting were observed. The best growth was observed in Bukidnon site, and the provenance 13240 (Ellerbeck Rd. Qld.) of the species exhibited the best growth performance at that site which could be selected for pilot plantation trials in the Philippines.

Abstract:

The paper presents the method of raising seedlings of Calamus viminalis var.
fasciculatus and their performance after planting out. Germination per cent of C. viminalis
was 24.37. Sunlight was pre-requisite for the germination. Optimum time for seedling
pricking from the seed bed to the polybag was 90 days after germination, and in this 100%
survival could be obtained. A survival of 98% was observed in the wildings when they
were transferred from the field to the polybags at an average height of 8.5 cm. One year
old wildings were significantly lower in height in the nursery than that of one year old
polybag-raised seedlings. Survival of planted seedlings at Hinguli, Chittagong in the
field was 77.5% after one year. Average height increment of the seedlings was 25.5 cm
with usually 4-5 leaves one year following planting under a teak plantation.

Abstract:

Hybridization of Acacia auriculiformis and
Acacia mangium occurs naturally because both are
pollen-pistil compatible, found within the same
habitat with overlapping flowering time and share
common pollinators (Zakaria 1991). Natural hybrids
of these two species are reported in Sabah
(Tham 1976) and Papua New Guinea (Turnbull
et al. 1986). The tree form of the hybrid of these two
species is satisfactory because of better stem
straightness, self-pruning stability, better stem
circularity and more disease resistance (FRIM
1992). Species/provenance trials of A auriculiformis
and A. mangium were established at Charkai,
Dinajpur, Bangladesh in 1983,1985 and 1987 at a
spacing of 1.83 m x 1.83 m covering an area of 1 ha.
The seeds were imported from Australia for these
trial plantations. Eight hybrid trees of these two
fast growing tree species were observed in the
plantation raised in 1983. The hybrids found sporadically
distributed in the plantations were identified
by the light colour of their bark. Banik et al.
(1995) also reported some hybrids of these two
species at Harbang forest areas of Chittagong
Forest Division. Some phenological information
and growth performance of these hybrids found
at Charkai are reported in this paper.
The phenological observations of the hybrids
were made very carefully every day for a period of

Abstract:

The Sundarbans mangrove forest of Bangladesh is very rich in biodiversity and
provides economic, social and ecological benefits to the country. This important
ecosystem has started loosing its biodiversity because of over-exploitation and
destruction of habitat. Emphasis has been given by the government of Bangladesh
and UNESCO on conservation of biodiversity in the Sundarbans. The paper deals
with the importance of biodiversity, current status of the flora and faunal diversity,
steps already taken and further steps needed for biodiversity conservation in the
Sundarbans forests of Bangladesh.
Key words : Biodiversity, conservation, endangered species, exploitation, extinct
species, Sundarbans
4^°

Abstract:

Agroforestry is not a new concept in Bangladesh. This concept has been practising
in this country for a long time. A case study of financial analysis on agroforestry
research conducted at Ichamati Research Centre under Chittagong district was done.
Tire financial analysis of both the tree crops and agricultural crops has been done
separately and combinedly. The trees were considered as fuelwood with six years
rotation. In both the cases, tire result is found to be negative. The present worth of
benefit is Tk. 12,610 (US$1 = Tk. 40/-) and the present worth of cost is Tk. 44,947. The
net present worth is Tk. 32,337 with a benefit-cost ratio of 0.28. The agroforestry trial
would, however, be profitable if 18 years rotation of the trees with ploe values and
other intangible benefit are considered.

Abstract:

The life cycle of the gall wasp, Andricus quercuscalicis (Burgsdorf) (Cynipidae :
Hymenoptera) involves the alternation between a sexual generation on the male
inflorescences (catkins) of the Turkey oak, Quercus cerris L. in the spring and an
agamic generation on the acorns of the English oak, Quercus robur L. in the autumn.
This study concerns with only the sexual generation of the wasp and its guild of
parasitoids. The generation was followed from the appearance of galls on catkins
until the adult gall wasp emergence in May-June and its parasitoids emergence in late
June.
The density of galls was positively correlated with the density of catkins on the
trees. The distribution of gall was clumped over the catkins. The sex ratio of the wasp
was highly male biased (68% male and 32% female), and the males were protandrous.
The sexes were patchily distributed over the trees. The sexual generation suffered
21.7% mortality through pupal parasitism by four oak-gall generalist parasitoids,
such as Mesopolobus xanthocerus (Thompson), M. tibialis (Westwood), M. fuscipes
(Walker) and M. dubius (Walker) (Pteromalidae : Hymenoptera) and 27.8% through
non-emergence, the cause of which was unknown. The parasitoids emerged from the
sexual galls of A. quercuscalicis were extremely male biased being virtually all males.

Abstract:

Trees of 21 species were grown in wetland rice field under farmers’ management,
including varying degrees of annual root pruning and top pruning to regulate impact on
understory crops. Tree height and girth were measured and pruning intensity was
observed twice annually. Rooting intensity of a few trees annually was observed by
trenching. The fastest-growing trees (mean annual increments in m^/ha at 100 trees/ha
and specified ages in brackets) were Gmelina arborea (10.5 at 6 yrs), Eucalyptus camaldulensis
(3.5 at 9 yrs), Faidherbia albida (1.6 at 9 yrs), Albizia saman (1.2 at 8 yrs), Melia azaderach (0.9
at 9 yrs), Cassia siamea (0.9 at 9 yrs), and Acacia mangium (0.8 at 7 yrs). Growth of most
tree species was slower on poor soil types and where vulnerable to flooding. On such
sites, E. camaldulensis, A. mangium, and Terminalia arjuna were less affected than other
species. Tree management by top and root pruning reduced overall growth by up to 19%
for gbh and 41% for volume, depending on intensity of pruning. Stand volume and mean
annual increment on an area basis in crop fields of average site quality were broadly
equivalent to forest plantations on average or poor sites.

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